Book Reviews

Book Review: Dead Reckoning, by Charlaine Harris. (Book 11 in the Sookie Stackhouse series 2011).


The book Dead Reckoning, begins as Sookie is finally cleaning out the attic, like she’d planned to in the last book. And what does she find? Nothing yet, but she will. The real story begins as Sookie is working at Merlotte’s later that day. She happens to glance up, sees lights outside, and a figure moving fast towards them. She barely has time to yell “Down!” before a fiery bottle is thrown into the bar. Sookie’s apron is briefly on fire before Sam puts it out, and also her hair, as they all scramble to put out all the fires. Shortly after, Eric arrives—he could feel her panic. But he’s almost too angry that Sookie was in danger, and she knows there’s something else bothering him.

Sookie is blood-bonded and married to Eric but she shares her home with her fairy relatives – her cousin Claude and great uncle Dermot. Eric has a new boss, with whom he just can’t get along and Bill is seemingly happy holed up with Judith, an ex-lover and vampire of his bloodline who has been helping him heal from silver poisoning. However, it isn’t long before the delicate peace of Sookie life is shattered. First Merlotte’s is firebombed, then armed hoodlums hold-up the bar looking to kidnap her.
Eric is, as ever, over-protective of Sookie but even he seems distracted. He’s arguing with Pam and won’t tell Sookie what’s wrong. Sookie suspects it has something to do with Victor, Regent of Louisiana, and Eric’s new boss. It’s odd to think of vampires having such mundane problems as hating their boss but since most vampire problems tend to have violent and bloody endings it’s much more thrilling than your typical human workplace drama.

As usual Sookie Stackhouse manages to find herself in predicaments that are completley unexpected and Charlaine Harris has given readers another fabulous instalment to the series. Dead Reckoning, by Charlaine Harris has lived up to the series expectations, with mystery and drama and of course action written amongst the pages. My rating for Dead Reckoning is 8/10.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

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